The Judiciary Act of 2005

     An Act to regulate the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and all inferior Courts of the United States brought under the authority of Article III, Section 2, Paragraph 2, Sentence 2, of the Constitution of the United States of America as amended.
The Judiciary Act of 2005
An Act to regulate the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and all inferior Courts of the United States
Be it enacted:
Article I
States
Sec. 1. That the Supreme Court of the United States shall not exercise final authority over the interpretation of the original intention of the Constitution of the United States.
Sec. 2. That such final authority to determine the original intention of the Constitution rests solely with Congress of the United States fully assembled according to a three-fourths majority of both Houses concurring.
Sec. 3. That no Court in the United States shall have any jurisdiction over any law passed by any legislature of the United States and signed into law by the governor of the said state except where such jurisdiction is specifically and explicitly granted by the Constitution of the United States or the Constitution of the said State.
Sec. 4. That any question of constitutionality of any law of any state may only be decided by petition of one or more state legislatures to the Congress of the United States fully assembled, and further any such question may only be adjudicated by not less than a three-fourths majority of both the Senate and the House of Representatives concurring.
Sec. 5. Absent concurrence and decision of both houses, the original intention of the state Constitution determined by the legislative history of that state’s Constitution and any Amendments shall control.
Article II
Citizens
Sec. 1. That on appeal from any decision of the Supreme Court of the United States regarding the interpretation of the Constitution of the United States as amended, either party, or on appeal from any number of citizens from at least three-fourths of the states of the United States, or any state legislature, or the Attorney-General of the United States, regarding any matter of Constitutional intent, either the House of Representatives or the Senate, each fully assembled by majority of those present may vote to hear or deny such an appeal.
Sec. 4. That having voted to hear such an appeal, both houses of Congress shall appoint a select committee for each to study the complete, available, public record relative to the issue or question at hand, and then report their findings to each house.
Sec. 5. That having heard the findings, each house with three-fourths of its total membership, both affirming their intention regarding the meaning of the Constitution, shall forward their declaration of  meaning so ascribed to each provision of the supreme law to the President of the United States for his concurrence or rejection by signature or veto.
Sec. 6. That those provisions so declared by Congress to which the President has affixed his seal and signature shall have the same full force and effect as the supreme law of the land.
Sec. 7. That each house shall forward only those provisions of intention causing dispute or disagreement amongst them, failing ratification according to Section 5, above, to a joint committee of both for resolution.
Sec. 8. That having resolved their differences, the findings of the joint committee shall be forwarded to each house again requiring an affirmative vote of three-fourths of the total membership to confirm their intention as to the meaning of the original intention of the Constitution of the United States, and then to pass those affirmed provisions to the President for signature or veto.
Sec. 9. That failing affirmation by either house, any provision declaring intention shall have the process of Section 7, above, repeated three times.
Sec. 10. That having failed to agree three times, the majority of those present in either house may forward the question to the several States requiring three-fourth of each division, if there be more than one, of three-fourths of the legislatures of the States to ratify their intention as to the original meaning of the Constitution.
Sec. 11. That if the President shall veto any provision of the interpretation of Congress as to the original intention of the Constitution as submitted to him, Congress shall have the power to over-ride such a veto by an affirmative vote of three-quarters of the total membership of both the House of Representatives and the Senate, or submit the question to the States according to Section 10, above.
Sec. 12. That absent or pending any ratification, while awaiting any process of appeal from the Supreme Court to the Congress, or while awaiting any action denying any appeal to Congress, any appeal shall provide immediate injunctive relief from any judicial determination.
Sec. 13. That henceforth, this Judiciary Act of 2005, may only be amended by a concurrent vote of three-quarters of the total membership of both houses of Congress, all other acts, rules, procedures, and provisions of each house excluded.

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